1849 essay civil disobedience

If the injustice has a spring, or a pulley, or a rope, or a crank, exclusively for itself, then perhaps you may consider whether the remedy will not be worse than the evil; but if it is of such a nature that it requires you to be the agent of injustice to another, then, I say, break the law.

When I was let out the next morning, I proceeded to finish my errand, and, having put on my mended shoe, joined a huckleberry party, who were impatient to put themselves under my conduct; and in half an hour- for the horse was soon tackled- was in the midst of a huckleberry field, on one of our highest hills, two miles off, and then the State was nowhere to be seen.

It is excellent, we must all allow.

On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1849)

If the injustice is part of the necessary friction of the machine of government, let it go, let it go: This is the whole history of "My Prisons. We love eloquence for its own sake, and not for any truth which it may utter, or any heroism it may inspire.

But Paley appears never to have contemplated those cases to which the rule of expediency does not apply, in which a people, as well as an individual, must do justice, cost what it may.

It is only expressing to men feebly your desire that it should prevail. When they called for the vessels again, I was green enough to return what bread I had left; but my comrade seized it, and said that I should lay that up for lunch or dinner.

All men recognize the right of revolution; that is, the right to refuse allegiance to, and to resist, the government, when its tyranny or its inefficiency are great and unendurable.

All voting is a sort of gaming, like checkers or backgammon, with a slight moral tinge to it, a playing with right and wrong, with moral questions; and betting naturally accompanies it.

But a government in which the majority rule in all cases cannot be based on justice, even as far as men understand it.

I perceive that, when an acorn and a chestnut fall side by side, the one does not remain inert to make way for the other, but both obey their own laws, and spring and grow and flourish as best they can, till one, perchance, overshadows and destroys the other.

The speech dealt with slavery, but at the same time excoriated American imperialismparticularly the Mexican—American War. A minority is powerless while it conforms to the majority; it is not even a minority then; but it is irresistible when it clogs by its whole weight.

Why does it cry and resist before it is hurt? It lies instead at the watering hole where right libertarianism and left anarchism meet to have a drink. It not only divides States and churches, it divides families; ay, it divides the individual, separating the diabolical in him from the divine.

After the first blush of sin comes its indifference; and from immoral it becomes, as it were, unmoral, and not quite unnecessary to that life which we have made. If they pay the tax from a mistaken interest in the individual taxed, to save his property, or prevent his going to jail, it is because they have not considered wisely how far they let their private feelings interfere with the public good.Neither, of course, did Henry David Thoreau, author of the essay “Civil Disobedience,” a document that every student of Political Philosophy knows as an ur-text of modern democratic protest movements.

This is an essay we have become all-too familiar with by reputation rather than by reading.

Thoreau and “Civil Disobedience”

In addition to Civil Disobedience (), Thoreau is best known for his book Walden (), which documents his experiences living alone on Walden Pond in Massachusetts from Throughout his life, Thoreau emphasized the importance of individuality and self-reliance.

In Julythe sheriff arrested and jailed Thoreau for his tax delinquency. Someone, probably a relative, anonymously paid Thoreau’s taxes after he had spent one night in jail. This incident prompted Thoreau to write his famous essay, “Civil Disobedience” (originally published in as “Resistance to Civil Government”).

On the Duty of Civil Disobedience () November 17, Lawrence Christopher Skufca, J.D. Leave a comment Thoreau’s classic essay popularly known as “Civil Disobedience” was first published as “Resistance to Civil Government” in Aesthetic Papers (). Thoreau - Civil Disobedience ().pdf - Free download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free.

When I converse with the freest of my neighbors, I perceive that, whatever they may say about the magnitude and seriousness of the question, and their regard for the public tranquillity, the long and the short of the matter is, that they cannot spare the protection of the existing government, and they dread the consequences to their property and .

Download
1849 essay civil disobedience
Rated 4/5 based on 36 review