A reading report on to earthward by robert frost

As you may have seen the poem is divided into two, the past and the present. To me what has always jumped is the second stanza, not for a particularly especial reason, but because it seems to be to leave an idea undeveloped: In the last two stanzas, Frost has once again changed his tone.

These lines similarly show the youthfulness of the narrator and how a young love forays romance through the use of flowers. Again, the narrator suggests his sad realization that loving too much seem to cause him extreme pain and sadness.

The second half, the last four stanzas, refers to the present and everything that they believe in and feel now. Though his work is principally associated with the life and landscape of New England—and though he was a poet of traditional verse forms and metrics who remained steadfastly aloof from the poetic movements and fashions of his time—Frost is anything but merely a regional poet.

Who is the speaker talking to? So what do you think about the second stanza? The narrator wants relief from everything and longs for the feeling of earth against all their body and the weight and strength of the earth above them.

The first three lines of each stanza contain three iambic feet; the fourth contains only 2. In fact, the line signifies how love seems to create an everyday suffering and heartache.

The author of searching and often dark meditations on universal themes, he is a quintessentially modern poet in his adherence to language as it is actually spoken, in the psychological complexity of his portraits, and in the degree to which his work is infused with layers of ambiguity and irony.

In particular, it shows the concept of how love can evolve over time — from a blooming and vibrant love experienced by youth to a broken love that yearns for healing and relief from pain.

It is written using eight cross-rhymed stanzas: Unlike the first two stanzas, the third and fourth stanza, seem to take a dark turn.

To Earthward Analysis

It is also apparent how these two stanzas have evolved from the youthful love in to an adult love that is now exposed to the painful reality. In this line, Frost paints a picture of the beauty and feeling of elatedness brought about by kissing.

To Earthward

Robert Frost really tries to convey the idea of falling in and out of love. The love the narrator describes here is so sweet that even the petal of a rose, not the thorn, causes it to feel like a sting.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading the poem and found myself connecting to it on a deeper level, love being more than just a straight line, being more than just the sweet things but also the bitter.

To Earthward - Poem by Robert Frost

Frost drifted through a string of occupations after leaving school, working as a teacher, cobbler, and editor of the Lawrence Sentinel. The poem itself is split into two different sections. Retrieved 4 July from http: They longed for a love full of passion and pleasure. The writer continues with his lament as he employs similarly sad phrases to emphasize the pain brought about by love.

What do you think? Yet, looking at the second half, we are given a totally different feeling. What is interesting about this question is that it seems directed to the narrator himself. Alternately, he compares his experience during his youth with the pain he is feeling now which is expressed in the lines: In the very last stanza, the reader witnesses the narrator stating that the painful love is not enough for them to feel anything and they are longing for something more, to be dead.

Either way, I love the poem and would love to hear your thoughts! The love went from sweet and toxic to salty and painful. Yet there is also a need for love, just like at the end of the poem, without love we would rather feel nothing, death, and I found this profoundly moving.

In particular, the narrator seems to express that the youthful love and the bitter love that he experienced is too much for him to bear.

Personally, I thought this poem was brilliant. I craved strong sweets, but those Seemed strong when I was young; Others: Or would it apply to other aspects of life? An Analytical Look By Sharon Mai To Earthward by Robert Frost is a lyrical poem, surrounding the theme of love, and exemplifies how love and attraction changes over years.

The second stanza posts a question.To Earthward by Robert Frost. mint-body.com at the lips was touch As sweet as I could bear And once that seemed too much I lived on air That crossed me from sweet things The flow of was it.

Page/5(2). In fact, Frost is a powerfully erotic writer, from early poems like "Mowing" and on through the disturbances of "The Hill Wife." The sensuality of "To Earthward" is acted out by its reaching, lingering, abrupt, or stretched sentences as they tease and cavort with rhyme and line ending.

Poem Analysis Essay on To Earthward By Robert Frost The poem “To Earthward” by Robert Frost is a literary piece that talks about the different stages of love. In particular, it shows the concept of how love can evolve over time – from a blooming and vibrant love experienced by youth to a broken love that yearns for healing and relief from pain.

Emphasizes the shortness of youth or a specific time frame brings back images of memories and pleasant childhood remembrances “That when they’re gathered shake, dew on the knuckle (11,12).” “I take away my hand, from leaning on it hard, in grass and sand (26, 27, 28).” (Whitey, np) Frost was middle aged when he wrote this (49) Love at the lips was touch (1) Picasso, Pablo.

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To Earthward by Robert mint-body.com at the lips was touch As sweet as I could bear And once that seemed too much I lived on air That crossed me from sweet things The flow of was it. Page/5(2). Robert Frost wrote the poem in while he was living at Little Iddens in England.

He was not to publish it until nine years later, when he was close to fifty years old. While the development of a kinesthetic motif is central to the meaning of the poem, Frost makes it clear that human experience necessarily embraces different forms of sensuality and that joy and pain are always mixed.

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A reading report on to earthward by robert frost
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